Allies

Allies

Disability is not a bad word, but DiverseABILITY is the preferred term to replace disability. The term DiverseABILITY embraces the uniqueness and potential in every human being, irrespective of their physical, cognitive, developmental, learning, and/or neurological differences, or diversity, in ability levels.

5 ways to be a better ally

An ‘ally’ is someone who has privilege, but chooses to stand for and with the disability community by taking tangible, ongoing actions to dismantle systems of oppression. Anyone has the potential to be an ally. Allies recognize that though they’re not a member of the underinvested and oppressed communities they support, they make a concerted effort to better understand their struggle, EVERY SINGLE DAY!

  1. Check your privilege: Lead with empathy, make it personal and be open to change. Ending discrimination starts with self-reflection. What are some ableist ideas that you have or continue to hold?
  2. Listen & get educated: Listen to what disabled people are saying – face-to face, on your social media feed or in the articles you read. It’s not about you, your feelings or opinions; it’s about hearing theirs. Seek out books, articles, films, etc. about the history and current issues
  3. Get involved & intervene: Join seminars & workshops conducted by organizations working for disabled people. When a friend, family member, co-worker or stranger says something ignorant, call them out on it. Silence allows oppression to continue
  4. Welcome discomfort: When you encounter something that makes you uncomfortable, don’t dismiss it. Sit with it, ask yourself ‘why?’ and welcome it as an opportunity to grow
  5. Stand up & take action: In order to become an actionable ally, your words and actions must be in line. Words without deeds are detrimental and can suppress any organization's ability to improve its culture.